Categories
News Policing

Community Speedwatch initiative in Wednesfield

Police in Wednesfield are working with members of the local community to tackle speeding, after it was voted a priority by residents at a local Partners and Communities Together (PACT) meeting.

Police in Wednesfield are working with members of the local community to tackle speeding, after it was voted a priority by residents at a local Partners and Communities Together (PACT) meeting.

Officers and Police Community Support Officers (PCSOs) from the Wednesfield North neighbourhood police team have been recruiting volunteers to take part in a Community Speedwatch initiative – where members of the public assist officers in capturing and recording the details of speeding vehicles.

Police then send a letter to the registered owner of the vehicle, informing them that their vehicle has been recorded exceeding the speed limit and encouraging them to slow down.

No penalty is issued in the first instance, but further action may be taken against repeat offenders.

Officers and PCSOs were out with volunteers in Kitchen Lane in the Ashmore Park area yesterday (Tuesday 16th November), which has been identified by residents as being one of the main problem areas, along with Peacock Avenue, Linthouse Lane, Woodend Road, Fitzmaurice Road and Clanfield Avenue.

A total of 28 cars were recorded as exceeding the 30mph speed limit within a two-hour period, travelling between 36 and 47mph.

Picture: Officers and PCSOs from the Wednesfield North neighbourhood police team with Community Speedwatch volunteers.

Sergeant Tracey Baker from the Wednesfield North neighbourhood police team, said: “Community Speedwatch isn’t about persecuting motorists, it’s about raising their awareness that the speed they were doing on a particular date, time and place was dangerous and against the law.

“Local residents have quite rightly raised this as a priority for the area because they are worried that sooner or later, somebody is going to be seriously hurt or killed as a result of a speeding motorist.

“We will be repeating the initiative in other problem areas over the coming weeks.”

Mike Fullard, local resident and chair of the Woodend Community Association, said: “I think it’s a good idea. It’s better than the speed cameras because all they do is aggravate people. At least with Community Speedwatch you get a warning, if you still get caught after that then it’s your own fault.”

Speaking about the reasons why people exceed the speed limit, Mike added: “It’s just the pace of life I suppose – people get up late for work and don’t think of the consequences of breaking the speed limit. They should remember the old saying – better late than never.”

Community Speedwatch volunteer Irene Dodd, added: “The speeding in this road is horrendous. I’m surprised there haven’t been more accidents. I think the Community Speedwatch is a good idea. Anything that encourages people to slow down is good.”

2 replies on “Community Speedwatch initiative in Wednesfield”

With specific regard to Kitchen lane, maybe the locals residents could also be issued with stupidity letters for parking in ridiculous positions, usually on the bend, making it dangerous every time you drive down that road.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Skip to content